Monday, December 13, 2010

How to Turn a Man's Shirt Collar

Did you ever read, in an old novel, that the women cleverly extended the life of their clothes by "turning" frayed collars and cuffs? 

Well, I have now done it! 

I didn't notice the frayed collar on this $3 thrifted dress shirt for my husband until I had it home and washed. I was annoyed. In the process of peering and fingering, I realized that I could just rip out the seam and flip the collar over and sew the seam again.



And, readers dear, it was exactly that easy. Truly. You don't need advanced sewing skills to do this. Just a seam ripper, a sewing machine with thread to match the shirt's seams, and about 20 minutes.


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14 comments:

Tracy said...

Bravo!

Marisa said...

Back in my parents' frugal days, my mom often did this to my dad's shirts. Best part of it is that she learned to do it by watching the Waltons.

Eva Girl said...

Looks excellent! I have a few of these in the mending pile, one of my husbands favorite shirts is looking pretty sad...

Jennifer Jo said...

What a pose he strikes, that man of yours.

Deanna Beth said...

That was superior thrifting you just did. I can't even believe it.

Heritage Farmgirl said...

Fancy you showing this! I did my husbands blazer this summer. The whole inner collar was gone. I put faux suede on it. Hand stitched it, did the trick and he is still wearing it. Saved me buying another $115. blazer .........for now.
That said, I would never show it. You are brave.

Sylvia said...

My grandma routinely turned collars and cuffs. She also took apart wool coats, cut new linings for them and put them back together using the other side of the wool. I'm wearing one of these that she wore in the '50s, a mustard colored swing coat. It gets more compliments than anything else I wear. Except from my sibs, who think it's exceptionally ugly. She also had a coat, worn, turned and worn again, that she took apart and cut down into a jumper with a set in waist. For her, thrift was as much about clever and creative as it was the necessity of savings.

Margo said...

Farmgirl, that is clever. I'll remember that. If your husband is happy wearing it, I don't see why you shouldn't show it!

Sylvia, I love your examples. Very inspiring. And your grandma reminds me of a G.K. Chesterton quote I want to put in my sidebar - about how thrift is creativity. And I want to see your mustard coat!

Rachel said...

OHH thank you for this post. I have often shyed away from doing this thinking you needed to be skilled, you make it look so easy and your explination was just wondefully clear,guess whos going to be hunting for worn collars now in the sale rail at tha thrift store lol
all the best
Rachel

meee said...

there is an old way done in ww2

is this the same way???????

Margo said...

dear meee, I don't know if it's the same, but it works!

Blackcurrant said...

Yes, but....(sorry) it's really annoying that the dress or business shirt doesn't lend itself to this method because of the stiffening bonded to the right side, stiffeners inserted, and that the underside is so creased and stuck that way, that you'll never make it sufficiently presentable. And all because of the wonderful bonded interlinings they now use. It would be great to get round all that, or use the underside and perhaps pinch a piece from the shirt tail to make a new 'right' side, if the shirt still has one! But where to buy the amazing interfacing they use, it's not vylene!

Margo said...

Blackcurrant, you make an excellent point, one I hadn't thought of because I didn't have a dress shirt that needed its collar turned. Unless the shirt has a very long shirttail, I'm not sure it's doable. . . how unthrifty and not cool.

Anonymous said...

I just did it for my husband. Did not know what it was called, I just looked at his frayed collar and cuffs and thought "I could fix them" and did it. Told my mum and she said it was called turning and that my grandma used to do it!

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