Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Four Heads for the Crock

I got five enormous heads of cabbage from market - I think the farmer charged me $1.50 a head.  I shredded and shredded and shredded cabbage on the mandoline slicer I borrowed from a church friend. (My shoulders and arms were sore the next day and I couldn't figure out why at first!)


So yes, the crock took four heads of shredded cabbage, pounded down with my meat mallet, to get filled up. I salted the layers as I went.



I put a plate on top, weighted it with a quart jar filled with water, and covered the whole business with a tea towel.  My husband carried it down to the basement and it will ferment for several weeks before we start tasting and enjoying.  I'm curious to see what Phoebe thinks of sauerkraut!

14 comments:

BLD in MT said...

Good for you! What a process, but a satisfying one I bet! I am quite certain you'll all love it, based on what I've seen. Funny marginally related story: Matt rather dislikes sauerkraut. When we had a huge cabbage pilfered from our community garden plot Matt said he was fine with it...as long as they didn't make sauerkraut with it! :)

Provincial Homemaker said...

Wow, that is an impressive amount of sauerkraut. Not sure it is helpful, but any chance any of your acquaintances have a shredding /grating head for their food processer, that you could borrow. I find mine so useful when I make coleslaw.

Lisa said...

Wow, Margo! I'm glad I have a food processor for this kind of shredding.

Margo said...

re: the food processor: last year, my husband used the food processor with the shredder and I used the mandoline. We noticed that the mandoline is much faster - maybe because it takes larger amounts at a time.

jenny_o said...

Have your camera ready for Phoebe's first taste!

beth s said...

I do love sauerkraut. You're an inspiration.

Hazel said...

I've made kimchi but never sauerkraut, I must try it. I think the family may take some persuading, so I may start with a smaller crock than you :)

Becky said...

So you just used cabbage and salt? I've made kraut before and I find I just don't care for it, but I keep thinking if I keep trying....

Margo said...

Becky, yes, and a little water to top it off. Ideally if you pound the cabbage hard enough, between that and the salt, it will release enough juice to cover it. But I did have to add a little water this time. I like my kraut really strong and sour, so I let it ferment for weeks, but it's possible to get a really mild kraut after only a few days of fermentation.

Sara McD said...

So, what happened to the other head?

Margo said...

In the fridge for coleslaw and other stuff.

Sara McD said...

Cole slaw, of course! Cabbage is such a nice inexpensive item and even though I never liked it much as a kid, I'm finding ways to make it that agree with my palate. For example, I really like the crunchy Asian salad from Budget Bytes. (Though that uses red cabbage.) My German great-grandma used to make her own sauerkraut and sauerbraten and other sauer-ish foods.

Margo said...

Sara, thanks for the recipe suggestion. I'm definitely going to try the sesame ginger dressing! Last night's slaw was mayo/lime juice with cilantro and the usual cabbage, onions, carrots. It was good, although I thought it needed a touch of sugar.

rachel said...

way more info on making a fermented cabbage than I wanted- but I read on anyways; since i love cabbage and krauts and the like:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/its-time-to-make-sauerkraut-in-romania/

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